The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, 1909-1949

calendarclock - (GMT)
Share


History of Secret Service Members LectureProfessor Keith Jeffery will discuss his groundbreaking new book, The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, 1909-1949, which is the first ever authorised history of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) – an agency commonly known as MI6. In his lecture, he will reflect on the opportunities and challenges involved in writing a publicly available history of a secret agency. He will also discuss SIS’s relations with government and the armed services over the first forty years of its existence. Above all, Professor Jeffery will examine the role and significance of intelligence in the modern world and the conduct of international relations in the first half of the twentieth century.

Professor Keith Jeffery is Professor of British History at Queen’s University Belfast and a Member of the Royal Irish Academy. His publications include Ireland and the Great War, The GPO and the Easter Rising and the prize-winning Field Marshal Sir Henry Wilson: A Political Soldier. In 1998, he was the Lees Knowles Lecturer in Military Science at Trinity College Cambridge and from 2003–2004 Parnell Fellow in Irish Studies at Magdalene College Cambridge. He has held visiting positions at the Australian National University, the Australian Defence Force Academy and Deakin University. He has also done extensive media work and in 2005 was a presenter in the TV co-production, Revealing Gallipoli.

An optional £10 sandwich lunch shall be available from 1215.

Professor Jeffery will be on hand to sign copies of his latest book, The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, 1909-1949 (Bloomsbury, September 2010), which will be on sale.

This event is open to all RUSI members. To become a member, please click here.

To attend this event, please register online using the "Book your place" button above. If you have any queries please contact Sophie Cordes, Events Assistant, at sophiec@rusi.org or call +44 (0)20 7747 4971.



Explore our related content