RAF Air Power Conference 2015

Securing the Skies: Protect and Project - enabling UK Defence to deter, coerce, and, if necessary, defeat a determined 'capable adversary' in contested airspace in order to protect national interests

Share
calendar - clock - (BST)
locationChurch House, London

Overview

The Air Power Conference is one of the highlights of the RUSI and RAF calendars. In 2014, the conference attracted over 400 delegates, including Chiefs and senior representatives from over thirty air forces as well as across the UK Ministry of Defence, UK government officials, industry representatives and academics.

The conference title this year is 'Securing the Skies: Protect and Project', emphasising that gaining and maintaining Control of the Air is the principal role in the UK Air and Space Doctrine, enabling UK Defence to deter, coerce, and, if necessary, defeat a determined 'capable adversary' in contested airspace in order to protect national interests. In short, it enables political choice and military options.

Given its importance, speakers will examine and explore that role and to discuss how it could evolve between now - coincidentally the 75th anniversary year of the Battle of Britain - and 2035.

The programme is available to view here and will feature the following sessions:

  • Why is Air Important?
  • Current and Future Threats to the Air Environment
  • Building Agile and Adaptable Air Forces
  • The Role of Technology

Agenda

Day 1

  • -

    Workshop Registration

    Sponsored by General Atomics Aeronautical

  • -

    Workshop

    Convocation Hall: Technology/ISR                           
    Harvey Goodwin Suite: Future Trends

    09:30: Capabilities and Demands of Sensors for Air Platforms
    Professor Steve Roberts, Selex ES          

    10:30: Multispectral Sensing    
    Gavin Dyer, UTC

    11:00: Future Vector 3
    Lieutenant General (ret) Frederik H Meulman, Joint Air Power Competence centre (JAPCC)

    11:30: Big Data for Air Forces
    Ross Bailey and Simon Doyle, HP

  • -

    Main Conference Registration and Lunch

    Registration Sponsored by General Atomics Aeronautical

    Lunch Sponsored by Lockheed Martin

  • -

    Conference Opening Remarks and Welcome

    Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford, Chief of the Air Staff, Royal Air Force  

  • -

    Opening Address

    Chair: Professor Michael Clarke, Director‐General, Royal United Services Institute  

    Keynote Speaker: General Sir Nicholas Houghton, Chief of the Defence Staff, Ministry of Defence  

  • -

    Session One: Why is Air Important?

    The so called global commons of the high seas, international airspace, outer space, and cyber space are interlinked. This session will discuss why assured access to the air environment is a crucial enabler of security and trade in the modern international system.

    Chair: Professor Michael Clarke, Director‐General, Royal United Services Institute

    Speakers:

    ‘The Economic Importance of the Air Environment’
    Dr Christina Balis, Principal and Director of European Operations, Avascent

    ‘How Cyber Technology is Affecting Airpower’s Mission’
    Dr Richard B Andres, Professor of National Security Strategy, US National War College

    ‘Military/Civilian Convergence – So What for Freedom of Manoeuvre in the Air Environment? ’
    Wil Wilson, Director, AW2 Consulting

    Discussion Session

  • -

    Afternoon Tea

  • -

    Session Two: Current and Future Threats to the Air Environment

    The security environment is increasingly complex and nonlinear. Threats are manifested through a range of actors and the proliferation of technology and military expertise. This session will explore how both state and non‐state actors are evolving within this context and what the implications are for both air forces and civil aviation.  

    Chair: Sir John Scarlett, Senior Associate Fellow, Royal United Services Institute

    Speakers:

    ‘Examining Trends in Threats from State Actors’
    Dr Igor Sutyagin, Senior Research Fellow, Russian Studies, Royal United Services Institute 

    ‘Understanding the Motivations and Capabilities of Non‐State Actors’  
    Air Commodore Sean Corbett, Assistance Chief of Staff J2, PJHQ, Joint Forces Command

    ‘Competition and Co‐operation’  
    Clive Wright, Head of International Strategy, Aviation Security Division, Department for Transport  

    Discussion Session 

  • -

    Closing Address

    Speaker: Air Vice‐Marshal Richard Knighton, Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Ministry of Defence

  • -

    Conference Drinks Reception

    Sponsored by Northrop Grumman

Day 2

  • -

    Registration, Refreshments and Displays

  • -

    Session Three: Building Agile and Adaptable Air Forces

    In the current fiscal climate, Western resources could continue to shrink, although the requirement for military forces is unlikely to change.  As a consequence, conceptual innovation (the ability to do things differently and adapt to the environment) will be essential to the operational success of air forces in current and future operations. This session will look at lessons from the private sector on building agile organisations, how agility can be generated within coalitions (recognising that many operations require a blend of partners and allies) and how agility can be encouraged through the management and development of personnel.  

    Chair: Air Vice‐Marshal Edward Stringer, Assistant Chief of Defence (Operations), Ministry of Defence    

    Speakers:

    ‘Stick and Rudder: Dynamically Aligning Ends, Ways and Means’
    Dr Eamonn Molloy, Associate Professor of Management Studies, Pembroke College and Associate Fellow, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford

    ‘Agile Air Forces in Coalitions’
    Air Marshal Leo Davies, Chief of Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force  

    ‘Developing Agile and Adaptable Personnel’
    Air Vice‐Marshal David Stubbs, Chief of Staff Personnel and Air Secretary, Royal Air Force

    Discussion Session         

  • -

    Morning Coffee

  • -

    Session Four: The Role of Technology

    Air forces rely heavily on technology and are therefore dependent on investment in technology to help deliver battle‐winning capabilities. The speed of technological change in the commercial sector is now out‐pacing military acquisition cycles and the cost of commercial technology is falling, making it more accessible to a wider range of actors. At the same time the cost of military (air) platforms is climbing so rapidly that it risks undermining combat mass. This calls for a radical rethink of the way we generate and sustain military capability.  

    Chair: Air Vice‐Marshal Richard Knighton, Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Ministry of Defence

    Speakers:

    ‘Capability Crossroads: Evolution vs. Revolution’
    Professor John Louth, Director, Defence, Industries and Society Programme, Royal United Services Institute

    ‘Small, Many, Smart vs. Few & Bespoke’
    Dr T.X Hammes, Distinguished Research Fellow, Center for Strategic Research, Institute of National Strategic Studies  

    ‘The Utility of Live, Virtual and Constructive Technologies for Training, Education and Experimentation’
    Air Vice‐Marshal Malcolm Brecht, Chief of Staff Capability, Royal Air Force

    Discussion Session

  • -

    Keynote Address

    Chair: Professor Michael Clarke, Director‐General, Royal United Services Institute  
     

    Keynote Speaker: Rt Hon Michael Fallon MP, Secretary of State for Defence, Ministry of Defence  

  • -

    Closing Remarks

    Chair: Professor Michael Clarke, Director‐General, Royal United Services Institute  

    Address: Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford, Chief of the Air Staff, Royal Air Force   

  • -

    Lunch and Conference Close

keywords
Share this page

Explore our related content