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Anti-Americanisms in World Politics

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03 December 2007, 16:00
The strong upsurge in anti-American sentiments around the world since 2002 is undeniable. The meanings and political consequences of these sentiments are less clear. Anti-Americanism varies too much, across time and place, to be reducible to one simple political phenomenon. Please join us for a discussion on the sources of anti-Americanisms in world politics with Professor Katzenstein.
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The strong upsurge in anti-American sentiments around the world since 2002 is undeniable. The meanings and political consequences of these sentiments are less clear. Some are motivated by the Bush administration and its policies. Others are touching on the very nature of America, the American idea, which appears to many as a serious threat to a preferred way of life. Anti-Americanism varies too much, across time and place, to be reducible to one simple political phenomenon. Its diversity reflects the nature of contemporary world politics.

Peter J. Katzenstein is the Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies at Cornell University. His research and teaching lie at the intersection of the fields of international relations and comparative politics. Katzenstein's work addresses issues of political economy, security and culture in world politics. His current research interests focus on the politics of civilizational states on questions of public diplomacy, law, religion, and popular culture; the role of anti-imperial sentiments, including anti-Americanism; regionalism in world politics; and German politics. Recent and forthcoming books include: Analytical Eclecticism (2009), with Rudra Sil. The Politics of European Identity Construction (Cambridge University Press, 2008/9), co-edited with Jeffrey T. Checkel. Rethinking Japanese Security (Routledge, 2008). Anti-Americanisms in World Politics, co-edited with Robert O. Keohane (Cornell University Press, 2007). Religion in an Expanding Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2006), co-edited with Timothy A. Byrnes. Beyond Japan: East Asian Regionalism (Cornell University Press, 2006), co-edited with Takashi Shiraishi. A World of Regions: Asia and Europe in the American Imperium (Cornell University Press, 2005). Rethinking Security in East Asia: Identity, Power, and Efficiency (Stanford University Press, 2004). He is the author, co-author, editor and co-editor of thirty-two books or monographs and over 100 articles or book chapters.

To register for this event please contact Lisa Muxworthy

 

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